edge-of-seventeen

The Edge of Seventeen Interview with actress Haley Lu Richardson

“The Edge of 17” is not exactly what it’s sold to you as.  By the looks of it, from the title, poster and the trailer, you’d think this was a film for young girls and young girls only.  It’s far from that.  Yes.  It is a tale of teen angst but is so much more in that we see not only Nadine’s (Steinfeld) low opinion of herself from the get go and her fighting or giving up, but we see a story built around that, with characters who are more than willing to indulge her in her self-loathing and the consequences of that decision.  Most affected by her parent’s decision to look the other way as Nadine wallowed in self pity is her slightly older brother, Darian (Jenner).  At the time of their father’s death, he not only became the man of the house, he had to also become his mother’s friend which turned into a job for him.  There are fights between brother and sister which are quite amusing but not what is at the core of issues the family faces.

Being a very difficult person to be around, Nadine has only one true friend and that’s Krista (Richardson).  Since they were little they did everything together.  Nadine loved her like family; trusted her more than anyone.  When her father died, it was with Krista’s help that Nadine survived.  Krista, like Nadine is a young woman now with a likable personality, pretty face and hormones that rage… something that doesn’t go unnoticed by one particular individual.  Nadine gets incensed and feels betrayed when Krista begins to date Darian.  She is no longer her friend and cuts them both out of her life.  Being a spoiled brat and getting her way when she throws a fit has worked so far… why not now?  To Krista she says, ‘It’s him or me.  Pick.’  Nadine the Terrible is surprised at the response.

“It’s a really fun movie…I highly recommend this film”. Shari K. Green

Sr. Film Writer and Community Manager, tmc.io

She does learn some sense.  She bothers her teacher, Mr. Brunner (Harrelson) every chance she gets.  He’s both a father figure and friend but doesn’t want to be either.  In a very Woody Harrelson way he damn near makes this film his own as he listens and responds to her tales of woe.  It’s a really fun movie and it feels as if it’s almost an honor to watch this character grow.

I highly recommend this film.  The writing is inventive, it gives a chance to female actors to play the characters given to males in a setting such as this and they handle their roles like the professionals they are; job well done, ladies!  One other reason to see this that stands out… it’s produced by James L. Brooks, writer of “Terms of Endearment,” “As Good As It Gets” and “The Simpsons”.  It’s hard to see through a keener eye than his when it comes to a hybrid of heart and hilarity.  Be ready for the rollercoaster.  This is heavy on the emotion sprinkled with laughs but then… so is life.

Haley Lu Richardson

Haley Lu Richardson

Plays Nadine’s best friend, Krista

Haley Lu was raised in Phoenix, AZ by right-brained creative parents, Valerie (graphic designer) and Forrest Richardson (golf course architect). She attended Villa Montessori school where she was encouraged to think outside the box and find self-motivation. She then went on to graduate from Arcadia High School in the top 10% of her class.

 

Haley Lu Richardson, who played Nadine’s best friend, Krista, and I had a chance to chat.  She was very bubbly and sweet and talked with her hands, often pounding the table to stress a point.  Here is some of that conversation:

Q.  How much input did you and you have?

A.  We had two weeks of rehearsal time where I literally just spent time with Hailey and we did our scenes and Kelly was super open to improvising in those rehearsals and what happens before the scenes and after not being stuck to the page to really figure out what’s going on in the scene and how people say that.  I didn’t do much improving on the day on set but all the work we did in the rehearsal period kind of changed… you could see the scenes change a little bit to how we would naturally do it.

Q.  Were you at all intimidate working with this group of people.

A.  My character was cast later.  Most of the characters were cast already, by the time they had auditioned me which was cool for me because sometimes when you audition for a movie you have no idea who you’re going to be acting opposite but I got to see who was cast and what producers were working on it and I got to see… so yeah, I was like, yeah… I was very intimidated but also equally or more so excited to just get the opportunity to learn from them.

Q.  How did you work on establishing this great friendship when you barely had a chance to do it on screen?

A.  I think the rehearsal period and Hailey and I got along really well in person.  She’s so cool.  I think the writing was great… just going with it and being there in the moment.  We both know what it’s like going through all that stuff in high school and how important that is and we just wanted to commit and bring it… the justice a friendship like that deserves.

Q.  Do you think a friendship is more important than a potential boyfriend or is all fair in love and war?

A.  We didn’t want to make Krista the stereotypical villain that ruins the protagonist’s life, you know?  We didn’t’ want to make her that.  She had reasons for what she did and also she’s not a bad person and she’s not even doing anything that bad.  She’s been such a selfless friend for so long and she realizes she could possibly have this really great connection with this guy and it’s like, you kinda have to do something for yourself at some point… I don’t even view it and maybe this is just biased because I had to get in this headspace to play Krista but I don’t view it where it had to be a choice between a relationship or a friendship.  I feel like, in the end, it actually could be a great thing if you’re looking at the big picture because if it does end up working out, we could just all be one big happy family.  (laughs)  If it’s not something full on crossing a line and disrespectful of a friend, I don’t think there really has to be a choice.  I think you can make it work.

Q.  When Krista and Nadine have a falling out in the second act, what was Krista thinking?  We saw her story but not yours.

A.  That was interesting.  It sets up a bunch of different challenges when you’re playing a supporting character because you don’t have the pressure of carrying the movie but also you have this different pressure of making your character well rounded even though the audience doesn’t see all of that person’s life… and also I’m kind of bummed, when you do a movie, you film probably about five hours worth of movie and have to cut a bunch of things out and there were a couple scenes with me and Blake who plays Darian that actually show us, cuz he’s not a bad guy either in the movie… you see everything he has to brush aside to take care of the responsibilities he has.  There was a scene where we were in his room and giggling and we hear Nadine coming in downstairs and we both stop and look at each other and there’s this moment that sums up where they were… that they both wished it wasn’t happening but had to follow their hearts and do some things for themselves.  She initially reached out to Nadine and Nadine didn’t answer but she just knew she needed to give her some space before they could ever come together.

Q.  It’s not a teen comedy but this is one of those movies that can define a generation like “Breakfast Club”… what are some of your favorite teen films?

A.  People are asking me a lot and I keep saying “She’s the Man” with Amanda Bynes.  (She laughs)  I know it’s a lame answer but I really love that movie.  I cracked up during that movie more than I have ever.  Whenever I have a bloody nose I use a tampon and sop it all up.  (Laughs)  That’s disgusting.  (Laughs)  Honestly, I love that movie.  Obviously, I love Breakfast Club and Ferris Bueller’s Day Off but I feel there’s stupid ones I like even more.  Mean Girls I really like.  So there’s my lame answer.

Q.  You’re a dancer… are we going to see some of that talent soon?

A.  I feel like you’re seeing dance so much on reality shows, the dance mom things, the step it up movies, there’s ballet movies but I feel like the story of like a training contemporary dancer hasn’t been told yet and I’d love to make that happen somehow.

Q:  What about you making it?

A.  I know!  I’d have to make it before I’m thirty-five before I can’t dance anymore.  That’s my goal.  I’m still dancing all the time.  I have a couple of injuries.  I’m twenty-one but my body is like a seventy year old because of all my dance injuries.  (laughs)  I have feet problems, hip problems and knee surgeries.  But that will happen!

She stands up and knocks on wood.  I for one believe this dance film will happen.  

almost-christmas

Almost Christmas

After the death of his wife the family patriarch, Walter, played by “I’m too old for this shit” Danny Glover, attempts to get through his first Christmas.  Writer/Director David E. Talbert gently starts the movie with a clever introduction of Walter and his wife, Grace, a cute young couple happily in love, and moves us through the years.  The clips, in particular, show Grace feeding Walter a piece of sweet potato pie, a Christmas staple, setting up the hole in the hearts and the stomachs of all who will feel abandoned by its absence; by not seeing it waiting for them to eat this year, by not seeing the maker of the pie.  As we meet the present day widower, we feel we know him and for him.

Struggling with whether or not to now sell his house, Walter decides not to tell his family but rather brings them all together for possibly one last Christmas in the family home.  His adult children start to file in, some of whom don’t get along very well, and he finds himself playing referee almost immediately.  All he is asking for from them is five good days, is he asking for too much of them?

Through the film, there are tender moments and comedic moments.  Mo’Nique is responsible for most of the comedy relief.  She plays Aunt May and steps into the role of her sister, trying to make sure this dysfunctional family doesn’t fall apart. She does a great job of making the audience laugh, dealing with the burden of the holiday and the heavy hearts within the house.  Writing slapstick comedy and mixing it with the appropriate amount of drama, plus the perfect chemistry of the actors on screen, makes this film one Talbert can be proud of.

“I’d put it alongside any of the comedy holiday greats”. Shari K. Green

Sr. Film Writer and Community Manager, tmc.io

There are a lot of moving pieces and a lot going on with this cast from Malachi (Malco) venturing into a business deal that would kill his mother’s favorite charity to drug use by Walter and Grace’s youngest son (Usher).  The sisters are about to kill one another, and while that’s going on one of the men, Uncle Lonnie, (Smoove) is doing the unthinkable during this holiday break with a cashier he meets at a store.

How these moments are handled, with fights or teasing, is what you’ll find it hard not to remember.  Hysterical scenes of the family coming together, such as a scene where they dance away the grief over their missing mother for a moment and flashes of discussing their mother and how much she loved them are the points of most significance in a film that almost all are.  The emotion is palatable and at times such as this in life, “Almost Christmas” will be one you’ll be unable to forget this season.  It’s usually a good sign that the director has done his job when at the end of the movie, nobody wants to leave.  Rather than stay for a second showing, you can always purchase this to keep for your very own as I intend to do.  This was almost the perfect Christmas film.  There were a few incidents where the performances went a little over the top but outside of those moments I’d put it alongside any of the comedy holiday greats going as far as to say you’ll feel the same way.  Take my advice and add it to your collection.

moonlight-feature

Moonlight

In “Moonlight”, a film presented in three acts, we meet Chiron, a young, poor black boy who knows he’s gay but doesn’t know why or what it means.  Chiron is growing up without a father and barely has a mother.  His mother works all hours and if she isn’t working, she’s doing drugs or turning tricks for drug money and horribly neglecting her son.  He struggles each day to raise himself for he’s alone most of the time and age nine, it’s not easy in his neighborhood to find answers to questions life presents.

He finds a friend, role model and father figure in Juan (Ali), who is not physically in the film very long but whose presence never leaves.  His character is what carries Chiron and the film forward.  Juan welcomes Chiron into his home, feeds him and shows the child warmth and affection for, possibly, the first time in his life.  Outside of Juan and a friend named Kevin, Chiron’s life is empty and it has left him an emotional cripple.

The film deals with a very sensitive subject quite delicately as we see Chiron has grown from boy to teenager; we begin the second act.  Juan has passed away and he has little to no ambition and nowhere to turn.  Chiron still has Kevin in his life, who has tried for years to toughen Chiron but has never left his side.  The cinematography is used to give you the feeling of being Chiron; alone, confused, chaotic and intoxicatingly muddled.  Some cuts are abrupt and there are deliberate projections of the young man disappearing or being swallowed by his surroundings not to mention an obvious use of hand-held camerawork that sets the tone of fear within him.  You’re absorbed into his life of being odd man out.

The movie will move you with unforgettable performances and an exquisite musical score. Shari K. Green

Sr. Film Writer and Community Manager, tmc.io

Little now understands who he is and a very tender sexual moment on the beach with Kevin is nicely and admirably handled.  Chiron is finally touched gently and lovingly and he learns there is more to life than anger and hate and that what people call him and that which he is inside are very different.

“Moonlight” offers a beautifully shot, sweet, yet at times, terrible look into Chiron’s sexual awakening and becoming a man.  In act three we see that he has toughened up but never has not let go of that moment on the beach; has never gotten over Kevin.  It’s slow at times but the movie will move you with unforgettable performances and an exquisite musical score.  The story is very well written and you’ll be affected by the subject and how it’s taken care of. 

hacksaw-ridge-movie-review

Hacksaw Ridge

War is Hell, as it is said, but a movie about War can go many different ways. “Hacksaw Ridge” plays up the unusual angle of a World War II conscientious objector who was the first one to win the Congressional Medal of Honor. He refused to carry a weapon on the battlefield, and instead carried 75 wounded men to safety on Okinawa.

Desmond Doss (Andrew Garfield) grows up in a backwoods area in Virginia. He was raised by his strict alcoholic father (Hugo Weaving) and loving mother (Rachel Griffiths). When his brother goes off to WWII, Desmond also decides to enlist. His new girlfriend Dorothy (Teresa Palmer) is surprised, because Doss is such a gentle soul.

Doss proclaims status as conscientious objector is valid in the Army. But it does not sit well with his superiors, Sergeant Howell (Vince Vaughn) and Captain Glover (Sam Worthington).  They try every way possible to make Doss uncomfortable so he will leave on his own. The base commander orders Doss to pick up a rifle. When he refuses, Doss is threatened with court marshal.

Doss misses the leave from the base when he was to be married to Dorothy. Desmond’s father pulls some old favors from a World War I buddy. Desmond Doss is set free again to become a medic for the unit.

As the war winds down in Europe, the savage battle rages on in Japanese waters. On Okinawa, the unit is sent to perform an impossible mission: take Hacksaw Ridge. The long climb up rope ladders deposits the troops in a barren field of death. Other units have tried to take the Ridge, and many have died fighting the Japanese.

The fierce battle starts death coming from every direction. There are tunnels and bunkers and heavy weapons that the Japs are bringing down on the troops. Doss and his unit are slogging and fighting on, at the cost of many dead and wounded.  The Japanese retreat into hiding, getting ready to come in full force again.

Doss remains in the field, up on top of the Ridge. He hears a weak cry and goes to help a soldier. And then there is another, and another. He devises a way to lower the wounded down the side of the cliff, so he can stay and care for more wounded. Doss becomes the only one able save some of the solders. He helps Sergeant Howell among others.

Captain Glover is shocked to see so many of his men in the field hospital the next day. He finds out that Desmond Doss treated and carried out each of the 75 men. Doss and the rest of the troops are ordered to take the Ridge again. But this time, all the men are ready to reach the goal, knowing that Doss had the courage to stay up on the Ridge all night and save so many.

Andrew Garfield does a marvelous job with the difficult role of Doss. He plays a man of principles who is put down for his beliefs, but who is so strong in his conviction that he makes up for the fact that he will not fight. In a bloody and gruesome situation, Doss continued to find a way to save his fellow solders.

Every other actor does a really good job with the roles that they portray. But a special nod must go to Vince Vaughn, because in this role he is stretching his acting ability to new level. He plays a drill sergeant with a slight sarcastic streak. He is nowhere as good as R Lee Ermey in “Full Metal Jacket”, who was the real deal.

Mel Gibson is the director, and he is making his way back to place of respectability in Hollywood. Gibson might be criticized for the level of violence and gore in this movie. But it is a War movie, of course, so there will have to be something that will be bloody. The first part of the movie is almost a fantasy of small town and rural life, so the next part with the blood and guts does come as a shock.

The true life story of Desmond Doss is worth telling, and this movie tells the story well. It dips into a section of extreme war time violence that is disturbing. But Doss made the choice not to fight, he made the choice to help save. He was recognized and rewarded for his efforts.

Inferno

Dan Brown as authored three books with a protagonist named Robert Langdon; ‘The Da Vinci Code’, ‘Angels & Demons’ and ‘Inferno’. All have now been made into a movie with Tom Hanks playing Langdon. The most recent ‘Inferno’ uses imagery from Dante’s description of Hell. So now the audience knows what they are in for…

Robert Langdon (Tom Hanks) is a famous professor at Harvard. Yet he wakes up in a hospital room in Florence, Italy. He has no memory of the last few days. Dr. Sienna Brooks (Felicity Jones) has been helping take care of him, but there is an assassin who comes in and attempts to kill Langdon. Brooks helps Langdon escape.

After much lengthy exposition, they find clues to a super virus designed by a mad biologist-billionaire named Bertrand Zobrist (Ben Foster). He planted a virus to wipe out 90% of humanity. Zobrist was being chased by international agents of the World Health Organization (WHO), and when cornered, he killed himself rather than reveal the location of the deadly virus.

Zorbist hired a super-secret security firm run by Harry Sims (Irrfan Khan). They were supposed to carry out his final wishes, but Sims finds out that the virus will be fatal to most of the world’s population. So he joins forces with the head of WHO, named Elizabeth Sinskey (Sidse Babett Knudsen). She does not trust him, but she has no choice.

Christoph Bouchard (Omar Sy) finds Langdon and Brooks, and he wants to know the location of the virus. He lied about working for WHO, because he wants the virus to sell it on the black market. Langdon and Brooks go from Florence to Venice, and then to Istanbul. Langdon uses his special knowledge of ancient history and symbols to find the location of the virus.

If this all sounds fascinating and exciting, then you would be mistaken. The characters exist only to spout off overheated rhetoric and exposition. Every conceivable situation feels contrived and over-the-top. People know way too much about ancient languages and historical artifacts. Main characters seem to change in a blink of an eye from a reasonable person to money-hungry would-be arms dealer or even a Zobrist inspired bio-terrorist.

Every person in this movie has difficulty being believable, but mostly that is because the story line makes them say and do things that are absurd. Irrfan Khan comes off the best, because his character is somewhat mysterious and morally ambiguous. Tom Hanks has a lot of dialog, but he appears to ‘sleep talk’ his way through it all. Felicity Jones is weighed down with an improbable switch of her character arc midway in the movie.

There is a lot of talking and running, and going from one museum or city to another. There is much movement, but very little in plot development. The major bad guy has committed suicide at the beginning of the movie, and he is not around to fight against Langdon. There is a supposed prior love interest of Langdon’s that is brought up, and that never is resolved. Many doors are opened, but nothing comes from any of it.

Dante’s Inferno was his representation of Hell, put down in words. The movie ‘Inferno’ is just a reimagining of the same Hell, but as a movie experience.

christine

Christine

“Christine” is based on the story of Christine Chubbuck (Hall), an investigative news reporter in Florida, where she lived with her mother, Peg (Smith-Cameron).  The most compelling part , and it is fascinating, of this sluggish film is watching people behind the scenes at a news station in the 1970’s, work with the tools they had to work with to run the news in the pre-digital age.  They were still cutting film together before the advent of video tape and it’s especially interesting watching them scramble to put a segment together last minute from the very expensive film they were then using.  This is where we find, Christine; behind the eight-ball, unhappy at work and depressed.  Her editor, Mike (Letts), wants Christine to do more “exploitive” work.  Mike wants his reporters to work on stories that have grit; stories that sensationalize and grab the attention of the audience.  What she wants is to be taken seriously by the public and do good work; work that will get her a promotion.

She struggles with the difference between what he wants and what she believes is right and when she finds out she has a tumor, Christine insists she leave her mark on the world even quicker.  Sadly, the film doesn’t concentrate on one subject long enough to give her one true and distinctive reason to be banal.  She’s unhappy but what can bring a person to be so tormented to bring them to do what she ultimately does?  She gives her editor what he wants, though.  She gives him a gripping story and a television first.

The film does exploit what eventually happens to Christine.  She gave Mike his story and she got the attention she dreamed of at the same time.  Unfortunately, the film depicts her as the coldest and most dreary individual ever born, with incredibly dry and humdrum dialogue.  Too dull that it becomes fatiguing to actually watch.

She gives her editor what he wants, though.  She gives him a gripping story and a television first. Shari K. Green

Sr. Film Writer and Community Manager, tmc.io

Learning that Christine had never had love in her life, never had a sexual relationship and clearly was not able to cope with the cards she was dealt any longer that she commits suicide on television for all to see, got people to tune into the news and might be what gets you to tune into this, however, had director, Campos, concentrated on how Christine could get to this point and gone back further in her life, rather than jump all over the place, (even making it unclear as to exactly who Peg was at first), “Christine” could have had you more engrossed in the story, in who she was and quite heartbroken when she takes her life; rather than just mildly touched, a bit surprised and not sure of the films true purpose.

american-pastoral

American Pastoral

Based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning Phillip Roth novel of the same name, “American Pastoral” follows an American family through a personal tragedy; the ultimate reason for it and result of it being very much the focus of that generation of American youth and the young generation of today.  In the 1960’s there were protests over war and protests for the rights of African Americans that got incredibly violent but there was something else going on with many of the protestors that went deeper than the known movements.  “American Pastoral” is a very powerful film about a father, Seymour ‘Swede’ Levov (McGregor) attempting to save his daughter amidst this chaos and ultimately save her from herself.

At a very young age, Merry (Fanning) felt she was in competition with her mother Dawn (Connelly) for her father’s attention.  This assertion needed a defense and she developed a stutter that her perfect mother didn’t have but which Merry always garnered pity and sympathy.  Though very young, she was aware of self.  Merry knew what she wanted; believing that, ‘life is just a short space of time in which you are alive.’  She lived her life with this frame of mind and still quite early in her mental development she witnesses, on television, the Vietnamese Buddhist Monk who burned himself to death in Saigon.  The reason the man did this was because to protest the South Vietnamese Diem regime’s pro-Catholic policies and its banning of the Buddhist flag.  This leaves a heavy impression on Merry and she grows into an angry young woman filled with guilt for her parents’ wealth, self-condemnation for living the good life when so many others have nothing and a general hatred for all things, making it difficult for her parents to know who she truly is.  She suddenly disappears after a post office bombing that leaves one man dead.  Her parents start to fall apart as the accusations and evidence against Merry begins to grow.  They begin to change during this process and the story goes from a sweet loving family to one divided as Seymour never gives up on finding his daughter, ultimately clearing her name and helping her.  When he finds his darling child and she admits her guilt, he still refuses to give up on her, loving her through the wrong she’s done and the shame she feels toward herself for being born.

Ewan McGregor gives a stirring performance and captivates the audience in his directorial debut. Shari K. Green

Sr. Film Writer and Community Manager, tmc.io

Ewan McGregor gives a stirring performance and captivates the audience in his directorial debut.  What little you see of Fanning is compelling and she, as well as her characters chilling beliefs, leaves an impression on you that is hard to shake.  Outside of the unnecessary narration and how the story begins, which is a conversation at a reunion, the movie is powerful and haunting.  This will be considered for nominations this year as it speaks to past civil unrest and what we’re still going through in present day.    

american-honey

American Honey

American Honey is sweet and wholesome; the film that bares that name is anything but.  It’s a raw portrayal of a slice of Americana that we want to believe doesn’t exist; that we prefer not to think about.  It’s captured with intimate camera work that masterfully puts its audience in the story with, even as, the lead character, Star (Lane).  Lane is a newcomer and does a stellar job of giving us a peek at Arnold’s idea of the challenges the young people in America face today trying to know one another and know themselves.  With particular interest cast on the poor youth of this nation, the story can be uncomfortable to watch.  They are expected to raise themselves and their siblings, while also having to try and keep up with the fast paced and changing world of technology that they might not be able to afford.  It’s true that text messaging and social media has kept us from speaking face to face, this is not so in Stars life.  She sees day to day what matters and faces some daily confrontations most never have.  She is also very aware of the planet and understands the need to save it… one honey bee at a time.  The environment and trying to save it is a very powerful message throughout the film, which does not go by unnoticed.

 

Star has strong convictions but she’s not otherwise worldly.  When she joins an enthusiastic and somewhat feral group of young traveling magazine salesman, she meets who might be her first love, Jake (LaBeouf), who she surprises with her confidence and her ability to love.  She’s wide eyed, has never been anywhere outside of town and hasn’t seen much, but that doesn’t mean she’s easy.  Fighting off advances from family members and being witness to countless problems befall her family she’s aggressive and fierce when she needs to be.  Taking on the task of sales, she tries the honest route instead of allowing Jake to teach her the way their boss Krystal (Keough, granddaughter of Elvis Presley) wants her to sell.  She’s unorthodox but gets it done.  Being stubborn and bullheaded does land her in some hot water more than once, however, watching this naïve girl grow up and become a part of something and discover herself as she bounces from city to city is incredibly fascinating… even though you cringe a few times.

The soundtrack, one I’d like to own, by the way, feeds the mood, especially the moment when the title song, “American Honey” by Lady Antebellum, is played and the entire crew sings with it.  The actors who expertly pull you into the narrative turn the movie into a musical from time to time and make it more relatable and moving.  The length is never an issue, in fact, I never once thought I was watching an almost three hour long movie.

Several scenes are surprisingly pornographic but they fall in line with the organic ambiance of the film.  It’s compelling, novel, and peculiar and about as uncommon as they come, which is why I celebrate this work and suggest you go to a theatre this weekend to examine it for yourself.

It’s one of the best films of the year.  

Jackie Official Teaser Trailer

JACKIE is a searing and intimate portrait of one of the most important and tragic moments in American history, seen through the eyes of the iconic First Lady, then Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy (Natalie Portman). JACKIE places us in her world during the days immediately following her husband’s assassination. Known for her extraordinary dignity and poise, here we see a psychological portrait of the First Lady as she struggles to maintain her husband’s legacy and the world of “Camelot” that they created and loved so well.