Interview with Alex Roe from Forever My Girl

Alex Roe Interview

 

I got a chance to sit down with Alex Roe, born Michael Roe-Brown, a handsome English actor who has been in films such as 2000’s horror/thriller, ‘The Calling,’ the action/sci-fi film ‘The 5th Wave’ in 2016.  In 2017, he was in both the horror film ‘Rings’ and the drama ‘Hot Summer Nights,’ which also starred Timothée Chalamet.  Now this year comes the romance and his biggest part yet in ‘Forever My Girl,’ for which he not only played a country singer but did the actual singing on two songs in the film.  By the way, not only is he good with his accent, he sounds like an authentic country singer from the south when he belts out the tune, ‘Don’t Water Down My Whiskey.’

He’s just fantastic and has a big career ahead of him.  Born on June 18th, he shares a birthday with another famous Brit, Paul McCartney, he’s much younger, of course.  Born in 1990, he’ll be turning twenty-eight this June.  He was really nice to talk to and was charming and genuine.  Alex sings when he knows no one is around to hear him, yet gets himself in a movie where he’s a big country singing sensation.  He’s not a bit shy but has such a gentle personality that he comes across that way.  He definitely leaves an impression on those who meet him, as he does in the film.  I hope you enjoy the interview.

We start and as I turn on my H5 Zoom Recorder he looks at it with concern.

AR: It looks like it could survive a nuclear attack, this thing.

SKG: It probably could, actually.

He eyes me suspiciously.

AR: You know something I don’t, don’t you?  All of your equipment is nuclear proof.

SKG: I know I can count on it to get a good interview.

He puts his hand to his head.

AR: Radio to sound dude.  And…

Alex pauses a moment before saying, ‘Speeding!’  Which is what is said when sound is ready to go and start to record.  I said, ‘Exactly!’  Actually, I wanted to tell him I could use his talents on set as a sound engineer the next time I shoot a short film but decided to get on with why I was actually there as time was of the essence… nor would I dare say such a thing.  Anyway, I had to know about his singing.

SKG: Did you pick this role because you know you have a good voice and wanted to show off that talent?

AR: I picked this role because… uh… because I thought it would be a really interesting challenge.  To have a go at playing a country singer.

SKG: You were already prepared then?

AR: I had sung at home and stuff and I had sung, like, in the shower and like when people were out so, I knew I could carry a tune and if they were ready to take the risk on me, that I would be able to work hard enough to hopefully make something work. But, umm… yes, I definitely took it partly because of the challenge of that.

In case you missed that… he sings in the shower.  One can only imagine.  Okay, on to the film.

SKG: Forgiveness played a large role in the film, as well.

AR: I thought the story of forgiveness and family and home and all of that kind of stuff was… nice.  It was different than the stuff I’d been doing.

SKG: The strongest message in the film, I thought, was to forgive and move on with your life.  Do you find that an easy thing to do?

AR: I think everyone finds it really difficult to do but I think it’s really important.  I think you can really, kind of, be set free by forgiveness, you know?

I nod my head in agreement as I believe it, too.  It’s so obvious that holding onto regret and anger will eat you alive.  His character, Liam, has many regrets that even being a mega-rich country singer can’t wash away.  Alex recognizes this.

AR: There’s a real strength in it.  Even with, like, little moments where you could not forgive, and you do, there’s definitely this empowering feeling cuz you’ve made the decision to forgive so therefore you’re in control of it and I like that it’s part of this movie.

SKG: Why, in your opinion, does your character, Liam, leave?

AR: (Takes a deep breath) I… think…yeah, that’s tough.  I think, really deep down, I think that he hadn’t really dealt with the loss of his mum.  (He’s silent for a moment.)  And I think that as he kind of explains and kinda comes to terms with it, I think he was just running away.  Running away from the potential of feeling the pain that he had pushed aside with his mum and the potential of maybe, like, losing Josie and all of these things.  I think fame was this really, really easy, like, gratification for him… that he could run towards and feel good, like, temporarily; because all these people adore him and stuff like that so, it became, kind of, an easy fix for his problems but those easy fixes are, umm, not long lasting.  They’re easy for a reason.  So, when he comes home he, kind of, figures out how to actually deal with this stuff.  That’s coming home and reconnecting to his roots and stuff. 

SKG: Is there at all a possible chance that he didn’t want to end up like his father, even with religion?  His father is a pastor so maybe even speaking to the religious aspect of the film, maybe he didn’t want to be.  And are YOU religious?

AR: I don’t like to talk too much about my beliefs and stuff, really, but I think that… I don’t think he was necessarily running away from the religion.  I think that it was more of a personal thing than a religious reason why he was leaving town.

SKG: You are building quite a resume of characters.  Is there a certain school of acting or method you like or prefer?  Meisner, Adler… Stanislavski?

AR: I kind of like to take little bits from all of those.  I’ve taken classes and intensive courses and stuff and that was my schooling really.  Taking little bits of everything.  And I think you, kind of… when you start working, you don’t necessarily draw on those techniques… you don’t really realize that you’re drawing upon those techniques that you learned but you are.  They’re ingrained there.  So, like, if it’s listening; like the Stella Adler listening and observing, then that’s something that you, that you just naturally do, hopefully.  Or, you notice that, ‘I’m not listening and observing right now and I need to.’  Cuz that’s what acting is; acting and reacting, ultimately. 

SKG: So, nothing specifically?

AR: I don’t know, there’s not one specific school… I think I’m just going to keep learning and keep studying and… yeah… hopefully figure it out at some point.

I certainly don’t think he has much to figure out.  He’s a strong actor who commands the screen when he’s on it and with his parts growing ever larger, he’ll have this thing licked before he knows it.  Now, regarding the movie, and a child actress in it, I had to quote W.C. Fields to him who said, ‘Never work with animals or children.’

SKG: In ‘Forever My Girl’ you worked with this little doll of an actress who plays your daughter.  Her name is Abby Ryder Fortson.  W.C. Fields famously said, ‘Never work with animals or children.’  You didn’t listen and Abby completely stole the scene.

AR:  Every scene!  As she should.  Yeah, I’m glad that you know who it was that said that cuz people have quoted that to me, but I didn’t know that, that was the person who said it.  But yeah… don’t work with kids and don’t work with animals.  I think with children, there’s an attention span that’s a little bit less than adults, definitely understandably, but I couldn’t get more lucky than to work with Abby.  She’s so smart and so, like, brave and she takes direction really well but is also down to improvise which is really amazing.  Half the stuff that made it into the movie was just Abby and I messing around.

SKG: Oh, really?

AR: Yes.  It was us like, ‘Let’s do this in this scene.’ And she’d be so down to have a go at it. 

SKG: Pretty fearless.

AR:  I got really lucky cuz she didn’t seem to have a nervous bone in her body, you know?  She was just having fun and enjoying it.  And it definitely makes you check yourself cuz enjoying it is so important.  Seeing a kid enjoy it that much… it kind of reminds you that, ‘Yeah!  You gotta enjoy this. It’s fun!  

SKG:  At what age did you start?

AR: I did my first movie when I was ten, so I could relate to her as far as, that two-month shoot that I did felt like a lifetime, so I knew that for her this shoot, like, every little moment was gonna feel like a month of experience.  So, that was really cool for me to see someone experience something that I did. 

SKG: You were into it really young.

AR: That was when I did my first movie.  I kind of took a little break from acting and I was playing soccer and, cuz that initial movie I just kind of fell into it… because they did an open audition at my school and I went up to the director and I said, ‘Look, I know that I haven’t done a lot,’ I was ten years old and I was like, ‘I know I haven’t done a lot but I’m good.  I promise.’  I was like really confident.

SKG:  You have to have that kind of confidence.

AR:  I think so.  Abby definitely has that in spades.

SKG: Yes she does.

Wanting some sort of scoop, I pushed my luck a little bit.  Okay, it moved away from the film, I guess, but you can definitely check out my review, for more information.

SKG: Tell me something, give me something, that you haven’t told anyone else before.

AR: (Thinks a moment) Something I haven’t told anyone else.  Oh!  This is… umm… wow. 

After a moment.

AR: I’m so open, I tell everyone everything.

SKG: (I point at him) Now that’s not true!  You wouldn’t tell me if you were religious or not.

AR: I know. (Laughs; continues to think) What’s something that I haven’t told anyone?  Oh, I’m sorry.  I can’t think of anything quick enough. 

SKG: Okay… favorite song and favorite movie.  Let’s hear those.

AR: Favorite movie, acting wise, I think ‘Mean Streets.’  Robert De Niro in ‘Mean Streets.’ 

SKG: And Harvey Keitel.

AR: That’s a really great one.  Then, favorite song… I think ‘Jolene’ by Dolly Parton.

SKG: Jolene?  Dolly Parton?  Did you just say that?

AR: Yeah.  

SKG: Amazing.

AR: You like Dolly Parton?

SKG: Oh, of course.  I used to live in Tennessee.

AR: Wow.  Okay. 

Alex smiles.  Dolly Parton.  Wow.  I wouldn’t have seen that coming.  Anyway, check out ‘Forever My Girl’ this weekend for some romance.  I think you’ll agree that Alex Roe has a big future in the genre… or any genre he so chooses, for that matter.  Maybe he’ll record an album someday?  Oh!  I should have asked him that question!  Missed opportunity.

Interview with Mark Geist and John Tiegen of “13 Hours: The Inside Account of What Really Happened in Benghazi”

Former Marines, Mark “Oz” Geist and John “Tig” Tiegen, were unable to quiet their minds and bodies on September 11, 2012.  They were in Benghazi, Libya, when what they were trained and ready to do, not what they were actually there for, kicked in; and luckily for anyone who survived because many wouldn’t have, had these men not been willing, ready and able to be, not in their words, heroes Read more

Interview with “Unsullied” director Simeon Rice

Interview with “Unsullied” director Simeon Rice


Directed by: Simeon Rice

Starring:  Murray Gray, Rusty Joiner, James Gaudioso, Erin Boyes, Cindy Karr and Nicole Paris Williams


By Shari K. Green

 

“Unsullied” is a film made by Simeon Rice, who directed and helped write the film after film school.  He graduated film school after he retired from pro-football in 2009.  He played for the Arizona Cardinals and also earned a Super Bowl ring in 2003 when he played for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

He was a very good football player but I’m not so sure that he’s going to be as successful behind the lens unless he learns more about what he’s doing.  We do need to keep in mind that this is his directorial debut, but he should take on smaller films and lighter topics first, “pay his dues” so to speak, because as it turns out, the film is sloppy and chaotic… muddled, and the problems with it were exactly what you’d expect from a new director who needs a bit more experience.  

When learning that there were several writers on the project, you can see why so much commotion made it to the screen.  I won’t lie to you… if you like the type of action/horror movies that come from indie or student filmmakers, this is what “Unsullied” has in store for you and you’ll like the film.  It isn’t special and it isn’t new.  What doesn’t work?  It’s in conflict with itself and its overall message is unclear.  What works?  Well, Rice has surrounded himself with some good people, chiefly, his cinematographer, Scott Winig.  The movie looks good so, Rice has some experts in his corner and if he wants to continue making movies, his love of film and eye for talent behind the camera could begin to work for him. 

As he declares in my interview with him, he’s very passionate about filmmaking and is humble enough to ask for assistance when he needs it.  It’s my belief that as he learns more about the game, as he did in football, there’s little doubt he’ll improve and even become good at this. That said, “Unsullied”, a story about Reagan (Gray), a track star who is kidnapped by a pair of sociopaths for a game of cat and mouse, is an extremely formulaic “B” movie, made more for Rice to get a feature under his belt than for an audience to love and then tout for their new favorite director.

I hope he absorbs the criticism about his film and what is said about him.  He should make improvements based on his mistakes and focus on creating a story that isn’t rife with commonality and concentrate more on entertaining his audience than proving something to himself and his friends.

 

SG: Everyone dreams of a second career and I know you’ve been asked this question a lot, but I must ask you… why film?

Rice I have a passion of storytelling.  I have a passion of… of creating concepts and being able to express yourself on a theatrical standpoint so… film, to me, is one of the ultimate levels of expression and freedom.  To be able to do that and tell your own stories in your own way from facts to fiction is just one of those things that resonated with me… and improved itself over time.


SG:
 You had made a short film, a comedy, and then you tackle an entire feature next.  Why such a tough project right away and what is the ultimate message you’d like to convey?

Rice:  That I’m a filmmaker.  That I’m telling a story and I can create details.  I want to go so far left of what people would expect from me and to show that I’m a serious filmmaker; as a storyteller and as of a responsible storyteller.  I have a film going into theatres nationwide and it comes from a very organic place.  Those tales I create are going to stay in the pulse of people.  I watched the film “No Country with Old Men” and as I sat and watched that film, I was so enthralled and into this movie, that I said, ‘I want to make a film similar to this’… one that’s going to lead you to the edge of your seat… that’s going to be an adrenalin rush of a film, that’s going to take you to epic heights and the lowest of lows, and things of that nature… so, I wrote “Unsullied” and “Unsullied” to me… it typifies the tipping point of what an action/thriller/suspense could be. 

SG: You achieved all of that.  It’s crazy, this movie.  Murray Gray was the perfect choice for it.  She was tough mixed with innocence.  Were you involved in casting her?

Rice:  Yes.  I cast her.  She was brought to me by a casting agent slash one of our producers, Michelle Gracie and… yeah… I watched a lot of girls.  I sat in that process and ultimately picked the one who suited this role the best.  Her and her ability to translate emotion really spoke to me and she really went after this role and took on a full commitment and the responsibility of what a lead actress would do and I’m overjoyed with her performance.


SG:
 Now the cinematic side.  You had to have spent many days in the woods, not a Hollywood set, and shot day for night and such in those woods.  I have to commend you for picking the right director of photography, as well, Scott Winig, who started his career shooting music videos and won many awards there.  He got some really beautiful shots that had to have been equally as difficult to capture.  How many days did you spend in those woods?

Rice:  We were there just about twenty days.  The shoot was twenty-three days and we were in the woods about seventeen or eighteen of those days.

 

SG: Wow.  That’s a LOT of work!  What was the biggest challenge for you there?! 

Rice:  I dealt with a lot of challenges but I think the biggest challenge was just… ummm… the anxiety of it.  Dealing with my own anxieties before shooting and having confidence in my own ability as a director.  But once I got on set, I think the biggest anxiety was the unknown; the fear of the unknown when you’re going into production.  But once I got on set, it all made sense… it all felt natural and I felt that I shouldn’t have been anywhere else but right there in the director’s chair creating this film.

SG: Well, congratulations.

Rice:  Thank you.


SG:
 I must know your opinion here.  Which do you find harder, a three-week film shoot or a seventeen-week football season?

Rice:  They both have their inherent strengths.  You have to endure so much as a player.  You have to endure so much as a filmmaker slash writer slash producer and executive producer.  They are both very respected in their own different ways.  Obviously playing football has a toll on me physically and creating films, you deal with great highs and lows… they both are different but both have their levels of complications.  I respect both professions. 


SG:
 Who came up with the title, “Unsullied”?  Are you a “Game of Thrones” fan?!

Rice:  I’m a “Game of Thrones” fan but it was more related to what she went through.  It begs the question, “Unsullied”, does she or does she not, you know?  It was just one of those things… the fact that the guys were so sullied… so tainted, you know?  She goes through this and we want to know, does she lose her way? 


SG:
 Right.  Does she stay clean?

Rice:  It’s also an open-ended question.


SG:
 Exactly.  So, what was your favorite part of directing?

Rice:  My favorite part of directing?  I don’t really deal in favorites because that’s an absolute.  I kind of enjoyed every aspect of it but really connecting with the actors is my biggest joy in terms of directing.  To connect with the actors in terms of the role, in terms of expression, in terms of casting them and communicating an idea and then working through some of the complications that come with it… that’s a joy.


SG:
 Is there anyone out there you’d like to work with in particular?

Rice:  I’m so humble.  I’m so fortunate if anyone would work with me.  There are so many great actors out there in the platform of theatre and production that if I’m connected with anybody out there that wants to tell a great story, I’d be overjoyed. 


SG:
 What’s your advice for anyone who wants to go into filmmaking?

Rice:  Come in the game very prepared if you want to see your story through.  Tell your story.  Tell your tale.  Be dedicated.  Make sure, whatever you do in terms of storytelling, that you have an outlet for the big game.  Be honest in your creativity.  Be honest in your storytelling… but be a responsible storyteller and make sure that the message you’re trying to convey is parallel with the message you want to get out there.  

Talking “The Choice” with Nicholas Sparks

Interview with Nicholas Sparks for the release of his film “The Choice”

By:  Shari K. Green


PHOENIX, AZ – Nicholas Sparks, as you know, is the author of books such as, Message in a Bottle,  The Notebook and  The Best of Me,  which have all been turned into big Hollywood money makers, not to mention the fact that these films widened his already immense and devoted audience with each movie; suddenly books had to be seen by his fans and the movies had to be read… pretty good deal for a Carolina Panthers fan.  When he came to town for a chat, I had to go there with him.  I asked and, yes, he’s for Carolina in the Super Bowl this weekend, of course, and I’m for the Broncos.  We’ll see.  Anyway, he sat with me and a few others to discuss his most recent offering, The Choice, opening in theaters starting February 5th

 Very bubbly and fun, he walked in the room and gave us a ‘How are ya’ll doin’?’  Then he grabbed himself a Coke, offered everyone else one, as well, before finding a seat and introducing himself.  He tells us that he generally has water the rest of the day, but touring means he usually has caffeine ‘til noon and this throws him off his normal healthier schedule, and how can you blame him?  This is how he gets through these long days of interviews.  His energy was very nice to be around and I find him to be quite warm and genuine; a very kind soul… sincere.  He looks you in the eyes when he speaks to you, making sure that not only he is heard and understood, but to be sure to give you the feeling that you are heard and understood.  He’s a very easy person to talk to and one I’m glad I had the chance to spend some time with.  Here are some of the questions from our time together.  Enjoy!!   

*FYI There will be SPOILERS

Shari:  You are one of the only writers to give us these deep romance stories from the man’s perspective.  Do you get stopped on the street and get asked advice on romance all the time?

NS:  No.  In fact, I don’t know that its ever happened before so how about that.  I’m not recognized by men.  I’m recognized by women sometimes, but never men.  Unless I’m supposed to be in… they know kinda where I’m supposed to be, I’m very seldom recognized at all.  Like, for instance if people know I’m in Phoenix doing stuff, they might see me in a hotel lobby and recognize me but had they not seen me on the news that morning, they might not.  So, in the history of my career as far as I know outside of my hometown of New Bern, North Carolina, I think I’ve been recognized… less than a dozen.  I had a lady sit next to me on a plane, reading my book, staring at my author photo… and she didn’t recognize me.  So no; but to answer that question I do, often by journalists, get asked, ‘can you give romantic advice?’  And I say, ‘I don’t think so.’  He laughs.


Shari: So you’re not going to start a column or anything?

NS:  Absolutely not.  I just try to write the best novels that I can. 

 

Shari:  Being that you’re going through some change right now, what advice would you give to students on making a life changing choice?

NS.: In general?  I’d say, ‘choose your struggles wisely because it is your struggles that will define the life you live.’  What do I mean by that?  If you ask people what they want, if you ask almost anyone what they want, everyone pretty much wants the same thing; they want a job they enjoy and great personal relationships, they want to be close with family and get along with friends, they want to be healthy, right?  Everyone… the answer is so common it’s ubiquitous, however, if you ask someone, ‘How do you choose to suffer?’  That’ll tell you a little bit about the person.  I choose to write novels.  I isolate myself from friends and family for hours on end.  The time vanishes when one writes it feels as though you sacrifice a bit of your life.  I’m willing to put up with the torture of creation, you know, the struggles of writers’ block, to get to the end, right?  That’s one of the struggles that I choose.  So, choose your struggles wisely because how you choose to suffer will largely define the life you live. 

 

Shari: Is the suffering worth it?

NS:  That’s the question.  Most people don’t, I find, get what they want.  They really just didn’t want it bad enough ‘cause if you really want something, you really will do what it takes to get there. 

 

Shari:  For someone who does spend a lot of time in their room, maybe on the computer or what have you, what would you maybe say to someone who needs to maybe break away from that mold and to kind of get into that “romancesphere”?

NS:  I would say that unless that’s what they truly want, they probably never will… and to accept that.  And it’s okay… to each his own.  (He thinks a moment and speaks again).  To… to step out of a box in which you’re very comfortable and put yourself in an uncomfortable position, you have to really want to do that and there are certainly joys and wonders that can come about but there’s also heartbreak and sadness which are also part of the game.  You know, everyone wants a wonderful relationship; they pretty much want the view from the top of the mountain but ya gotta be willing to walk up the mountain.  Ya gotta be able to do the climb so, if they’re not willing to then have them accept themselves and to make the most of the lives they can with the friends they have and life’s about enjoyment.  Life’s not only about work, it’s about enjoyment so as long as they’re good, I’m good.

 
Shari:  Has anyone made a decision that you didn’t like?  One that you had no say in; that’s the way it’s going to be?

NS:  Has anyone made a decision I didn’t like.  Sure!  We can start with my children.  (Laughs)  Of course, you know?  And… I suppose it goes to the nature of the question that was up to require the decision, right?  Most of the time I try to live my life by simple words that my mom taught me, ‘If someone says something you don’t like, or you disagree with, say, (And this is true though) it’s your life you can do with it what you want… you can.’  Now how I deal with that, that’s up to me, but you can do whatever you want.  My children hate when I tell them that.  They hate it with a passion, like, ‘Put all the burden on me!’  But it’s very true.  I don’t know how successful you’ve been at running someone else’s life, but I already found that it’s not very successful so I try not to give advice.

Shari:  What are their age ranges?

NS:  Fourteen to Twenty-Four.  But it’s not just them, it’s siblings and people you work with.  People are going to do what they’re going to do and the only thing you can control is how you respond to it.

 

Shari:  Religion became a part of the narrative of the story, subtly and not so subtly; where Travis pulled away from his faith.  Do you think that after the story ended, that Travis would go back to his faith?

NS: My opinion is that it would be difficult for Travis not to go back to his faith.  That would be my thought on that subject but, of course, that’s just my opinion on the matter.  And that was not an element that was within the novel.  That was an element that came about in the film… and so, I suppose an even better person to ask would be Ben Walker for his version of the character and the director (Ross Katz).

 

Shari:  How did you bring Gabby (Teresa Palmer) and Travis (Benjamin Walker) together?!  They had such great onscreen chemistry.

NS:  First we cast people who we thought were immensely talented and then throughout the casting process, we look for chemistry.  How do they seem to get along, do they seem to be friends… and Teresa has one of these personalities that draws everyone in, and so does Ben, in fact.  And so, what they had was just magnetic, even in the read, so, when we put them on screen, when you get them in the big picture, it comes across as being incredible.  But it’s something that we definitely look for.

 

Shari:  The brother/sister relationship that you had occur… is there something in your personal life that you drew from because the sister is very likeable.  Her character brought a lot to the film.

NS:  The sister in the novel was an even broader character.  I’ve been asked numerous times to write a story about the sister cuz she had it all together and she really did.  She was as comfortable as he was, with herself and I find that a wonderful element to someone’s personality… just the comfort with who they are.  So, yeah, I was very close to my siblings growing up and I’m still incredibly close to my brother; we actually took a trip around the world and I wrote a non-fiction book about that called “Three Weeks with My Brother”.  And, I’d say I’m close to my sister, too, but she passed away.  She passed away from a brain tumor about sixteen years ago… so… yeah, the relationship between Ben and his sister was very much inspired by the relationship that I have with my siblings.  I had parents that really stressed the fact that your siblings will always be around.  Your friends will come and go but your family’s there forever.  In many ways, they are the people that you can tell anything to and they still keep coming back… right?

Travis Shaw (Ben Walker) and Gabby Holland (Teresa Palmer) in THE CHOICE. Photo Credit: Dana Hawley

Shari:  Up to the accident, you have your love story… and then the accident happened and I’m in tears; multiple times throughout.  What about trauma do you think makes the story that much better?

NS:  Well, I write in a very distinct genre… it’s really called a love story as distinguished from a romance novel; a romance novel is really about romantic fantasy and it’s really supposed to be able to allow the reader to escape into a world and you go through conflicts but you pretty much know that the couple is going to get together in the end.  That’s what it’s about and that’s why you read them and it’s certainly a very valid, you know, it’s a wonderful genre; Cinderella.  I mean, it works every time.  This is a love story and a love story is not necessarily romantic fantasy, although there are romantic elements.  The purpose of that is to move the reader or the viewer through all of the emotions of life; to make it feelreal so you might call it romantic realism versus romantic fantasy.  And that realism requires the reader or the viewer feel all of the emotions of life, cuz otherwise something’s missing… you know that; and the simple fact of life is that everyone goes through tragedy.  There’s not one of us that will escape scot-free.   So, we have characters that feel real then they go through emotions that feel real… and they allow you, the viewer or reader to live someone else’s but to feel like it was a full life; like you got it all even though it was just a snippet… a point in time. 

 

Shari:  You have romance down, for sure, have you ever, even if you did it under a pseudonym or something, considered writing maybe a horror novel ala Stephen King; try a different genre?

NS:  No.  I don’t.  I’m very happy writing the kind of novels I write.  One of the wonderful things about the genre in which I work, is that I’m able to pull elements from all sorts of genres and build them into my novels.  For instance, “See Me”, is my latest novel; it’s a love story; these two opposite characters meet, it’s my first Hispanic character and she’s a lawyer and this guy is a reformed bad-boy and, okay, they’re going to make it work… overcome these obstacles.  And somewhere around the halfway point the novel starts devolving into a very twisty mystery thriller.  Something like my attempt at what Harlen Coben would do.  And I’m not saying I did it but it was my attempt to do what he does so expertly well… and part of the fun of that novel is, the tension is increasing and you’re not even sure what’s going on.  The reader is as confused as the characters in the novel.  You can just feel the tension growing and growing.  So, I can put elements of mystery into my novels.  I put elements of the supernatural in “Safe Haven”… take that for what it’s worth… it’s very light.  Uhh… Epic.  I’ve done epic sweeping stories like “The Longest Ride”.  So, all of these elements that are particular to various genres, I’ve been able to put into mine. 

 

Shari:  Have you ever or are you now, writing with a specific actor in mind?

NS:  No.  The only time I did that was for “The Last Song”.  If the movie got made it would be for Miley Cyrus and that’s because I worked with Disney on the project.

 

Shari:  Never??

NS:  No.  No.  (Laughs)  I never… never… no.  (Laughs again)

 

Shari:.  I love the cast, especially the side characters, Tom Wilkinson and Tom Welling are terrific… umm… were there any jokes on the set or how was Ben feeling about stealing Superman’s girlfriend?

NS:  There weren’t any particular jokes about that.  It was a very familial set because we asked all of those characters to have arcs; even the father had an arc, you know, the sister had an arc.  So, because they all had arcs, we all asked them to do various things emotionally and… we wanted them to be very comfortable, really experimenting… pressing themselves, going out on a limb, really (allowing) them to evoke these emotions in the viewer in a real way and we did that by having it become a family setting.  When they’re filming the backyard for the bbq, things like that, it was like we were at a backyard bbq.  The dogs were running around, the kids were over there… the sun, it’s beautiful, it’s warm, you’re in your shorts, you’re cooking on the grill; it was like, ‘I can’t believe we’re working.’  It was more like that. 

 

Shari:  What’s it like seeing your novels come to life from a producer’s point of view?

NS:  It’s a lot of thought.  I love the fact that viewers are going to see a new way to hear the story that I conceived.  I have my chance to tell the story the way I did in the novel… but let’s see how someone else does with my story, you know?  What kind of colors, who are we going to cast, how are we going to frame this… what elements do we keep, what elements do we change to capture the whole spirit of the story and the characters.  For me it’s a wonderful way to experience the story in a different medium.

 

Shari:  Have you ever thought of just skipping the whole novel thing and just writing the screenplay and producing films yourself?

NS:  Sure I have and I’ve chosen to do that in television not as far as film.  Television is a bit more like a novel so you have a longer opportunity to tell a specific story.  I’m currently, for instance, writing a pilot for HBO but that’ll give me ten episodes to tell a full story.

Gabby Holland (Teresa Palmer) and Travis Shaw (Ben Walker) in THE CHOICE. Photo Credit: Dana Hawley

Shari:  The big ending, whether she lives or dies… what was the deciding factor for you?  Was there a deciding factor?

NS:  Well, it was during the course of the novel and, of course, that’s what happens in the novel is what I’m trying to say there; and I knew all along that she would come out.  I knew.  I didn’t… I didn’t want to… uhhh, I just knew but it was to bring the reader through all the emotions on the way to get there because… because sometimes these things happen; sometimes they don’t.  When they do, there’s a really magical and wondrous feeling with it.

 

Shari:  The husband in a film called 45 Years that just came out, says “All of the big decisions that we make, we do when we’re young; big decisions /choices”.  And he had a real defeatist attitude which I don’t agree with.  What is your take on that?  I think we can make life changing choices every day.

NS:  Of course.  And at the same time, there’s some validity (in it), when you’re young is usually when you choose your career, you might choose a partner or a spouse to be with; you might choose whether or not to have children and there are certain points in time when some of those are no longer valid.  If you’re a woman and all of the sudden you’re fifty and you never had children… you can’t bear them.  You might be able to adopt, but you can’t bear them.  So, some choices, just by the nature of time itself… yeah, they come and go and they’re focus is more when you’re young.  However, there’s always major choices that one can make because there’s always the kind of life that you want to live and the new strugglesor the new sufferingsthat you’re willing to experience to get there; right?  You want to go climb Mount Everest?  Sure.  Someone’s done that in their seventies.  Alright… you’re willing to do that suffering; all the training… are you willing?  Do you really want to climb Everest?  That would be one example, but sure it’s possible

 

I know what else is possible… you running to the theater this weekend and checking out Lionsgate presenting a Nicholas Sparks / Safran Company / POW! Production of  The Choice starring  Benjamin Walker, Teresa Palmer, Maggie Grace, Alexandra Daddario, Tom Welling, Brett Rice, and Tom Wilkinson.  Don’t forget to come back and let me know what you think of it!!!  Have fun and Go Broncos!  *Although, I have a feeling Sparks will win this one… just like his film will.  Bring a tissue!