GUY FIERI IS ON MISSION TO FIND FOOD NETWORK’S NEXT BIG FOOD-ROAD SHOW ON ALL-NEW “GUY’S BIG PROJECT”

GUY’S BIG PROJECT

NEW Series Premieres Sunday, November 5th at 9pm ET/PT 

New York – September 29, 2017 – Guy Fieri has visited thousands of restaurants on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives, literally putting food-road shows on the map. Now, Guy is searching for Food Network’s next big culinary-travel series. After receiving and sorting through thousands of submissions from hopeful hosts with promising concepts, Guy and his team of food and television experts narrowed it down to a final group of prospects that will vie to have their idea developed into a show on Guy’s Big Project. The six-episode journey begins on Sunday, November 5th at 9pm ET/PT and documents every twist and turn as the prospects move from initial pitch through development to network review, to the ultimate end goal – the premiere of a new show on Food Network.

“Over a decade ago I was given a chance that I could never have dreamed of on Food Network Star, and now I’m honored to have the opportunity to help make someone else’s dream a reality,” said Fieri. “As a producer, I know what it takes to get a show off the ground, and we will see if these prospects have the passion and skills needed because a great idea is just the first step.”

Guy’s Big Project invites viewers behind-the-scenes to see how a series goes from a passionate idea to a reality on-air,” said Courtney White, Senior Vice President Programming, Scripps Networks Interactive. “Guy’s betting on not only identifying the next big idea for the network, but he’s also committed to doing everything needed to help the prospects succeed.”

Guy and his team of experts including Food Network’s Alex Guarnaschelli and veteran television producer Mark Dissin, are taking the most promising prospects out on the road to see who has what it takes to be a success. The journey begins with the finalists picking a restaurant that best represents them and their show idea, where they film a pitch video to convey what their show would be about. Then, the pressure heats up as they whip up a meal in Guy’s personal kitchen that embodies their idea. One prospect will find the feedback hard to chew and will be sent home.

As the season progresses, the prospects are put through the paces by Guy and his team, learning that there is a lot more to hosting a food-television show than a passion for food and cooking skills.  From describing each bite of food in order to convey the flavors, aromas and textures, to engaging the audience while eating and interviewing a wide variety of chefs, there is a lot to digest especially when your hopes and dreams are on the line.

On the finale on Sunday, December 10th at 9pm ET/PT, the remaining prospects each shoot a pilot employing all the skills they learned from the previous weeks. After submitting their tapes to the network, they must wait to hear the decision. Immediately following the finale, at 10pm ET/PT, viewers will find out who made the cut as they get a sneak peek of the winner’s series!

The prospects include: Mark Anderson (Boise, Idaho) together with Ryan Fey (Los Angeles, California), Zane Caplansky (Toronto, Canada), Sharon Damante (Napa, California) together with Sherri Williams (Crestview, Florida), Christian Gill (Cincinnati, Ohio), Lindsay Greene (Atlanta, Georgia), Rashad Jones (Ocala, Florida), Dariany Santana(Kenilworth, New Jersey), and Vincenzo Vaccaro (Astoria, New York).

Fans can get an insider’s look at the making of Guy’s Big Project with behind-the-scenes photos of Guy and the prospects, as well as bonus videos and recipes inspired by the show at FoodNetwork.com/GuysBigProject. To join the conversation on social media use #GuysBigProject.

christine

Christine

“Christine” is based on the story of Christine Chubbuck (Hall), an investigative news reporter in Florida, where she lived with her mother, Peg (Smith-Cameron).  The most compelling part , and it is fascinating, of this sluggish film is watching people behind the scenes at a news station in the 1970’s, work with the tools they had to work with to run the news in the pre-digital age.  They were still cutting film together before the advent of video tape and it’s especially interesting watching them scramble to put a segment together last minute from the very expensive film they were then using.  This is where we find, Christine; behind the eight-ball, unhappy at work and depressed.  Her editor, Mike (Letts), wants Christine to do more “exploitive” work.  Mike wants his reporters to work on stories that have grit; stories that sensationalize and grab the attention of the audience.  What she wants is to be taken seriously by the public and do good work; work that will get her a promotion.

She struggles with the difference between what he wants and what she believes is right and when she finds out she has a tumor, Christine insists she leave her mark on the world even quicker.  Sadly, the film doesn’t concentrate on one subject long enough to give her one true and distinctive reason to be banal.  She’s unhappy but what can bring a person to be so tormented to bring them to do what she ultimately does?  She gives her editor what he wants, though.  She gives him a gripping story and a television first.

The film does exploit what eventually happens to Christine.  She gave Mike his story and she got the attention she dreamed of at the same time.  Unfortunately, the film depicts her as the coldest and most dreary individual ever born, with incredibly dry and humdrum dialogue.  Too dull that it becomes fatiguing to actually watch.

She gives her editor what he wants, though.  She gives him a gripping story and a television first. Shari K. Green

Sr. Film Writer and Community Manager, tmc.io

Learning that Christine had never had love in her life, never had a sexual relationship and clearly was not able to cope with the cards she was dealt any longer that she commits suicide on television for all to see, got people to tune into the news and might be what gets you to tune into this, however, had director, Campos, concentrated on how Christine could get to this point and gone back further in her life, rather than jump all over the place, (even making it unclear as to exactly who Peg was at first), “Christine” could have had you more engrossed in the story, in who she was and quite heartbroken when she takes her life; rather than just mildly touched, a bit surprised and not sure of the films true purpose.